Getting Candidates to Run On Your Political Party’s Tickets

One of the ways in which the strength of a political party is gauged is by looking at the number of candidates (in elections) who run on the party’s ticket. A party that attracts many candidates to run on its tickets is regarded as a stronger/better party than one that only attracts a modest number of candidates. Furthermore, the higher the number of candidates who run on your party’s ticket, the greater the probability of at least some of them winning the seats they are running for. And once a party has a sizeable number of leaders elected on its ticket, it starts being regarded as a force to reckon with. This, of course, only applies in true multiparty democracies – not in de facto single party states (like China) or two party systems (like the USA, where it is very hard for third party candidates to win any seat).

Now to get a huge number of candidates to run on your political party’s tickets, you need to:

  1. Get many people to know about the party: as a greater number of people get to know about your party (and what your party stands for), you will naturally start to see more and more people expressing interest in running on the party’s tickets in elections.
  2. Charge modest nomination fees: this especially makes sense if yours is a new/young party that is still trying to gain traction on the ground. You have to understand that some of the potential candidates are likely to be people of modest means. You may, for instance, even have some liteblue usps employees (that is, rank and file employees at USPS) expressing an interest in running on your party’s ticket for various positions. These, obviously, are folks who only get modest paychecks through the USPS HR portal — at liteblue.USPS.gov. If you charge heft nomination fees, such candidates may not afford them. They may subsequently opt for parties charging lower nomination fees, or simply run as independents.
  3. Conduct free and fair nominations: this will enhance candidates’ confidence in your political party. As a consequence, you are likely to see more and more people expressing interest in running on your party’s ticket in the future.

How to Conduct Political Party Nominations

Sometimes, you may have two or more candidates who are interested in running on your party’s ticket for a seat. For instance, there may be an upcoming parliamentary election, where two or more candidates are interested in running on your party’s ticket. Or there may be an upcoming local council election, where two or more candidates are interested in running on your party’s ticket. In such situations, you will find yourself having to conduct nominations. You would be doing so in order to select the candidate who would run on your party’s ticket for the seat in question. And there are 3 main ways in which you can conduct the political party nominations, namely:

  1. Through secret ballot: here, you invite the members of the party to cast ballots for their preferred candidates. The candidate who gets the most ballots is subsequently nominated, and thus given the party’s ticket to run for the seat in question.
  2. Through boardroom interviews: this is where the people who are interested in the party’s ticket are subjected to interviews (by a panel), to select the one who is most likely to be successful. This approach can be very useful if some of the people who have expressed interest in the party’s ticket are obviously jokers. You may, for instance, have a fellow who is just an entry-level employee at, say, Walmart — yet he has expressed interest in the party’s ticket. Yet the fellow knows very well that his work schedule (accessible at www.walmartone.com) can’t allow him to have enough time to campaign. Further, upon visiting the Walmartone associate login page, signing in, and checking his paystubs, he knows very well that he can’t finance a serious campaign. Yet he insists that he must be awarded the party’s ticket! It is only through boardroom interviews that such ‘joker’ candidates can be weeded out.
  3. Through consensus: this is where you can get the two or more people who are interested in the party’s ticket to sit down, and agree on whom the most viable candidate among them is. This may, however, turn out to be a tricky exercise in situations where each of the candidates feels that he is the best.